11.04.2011

Winter Scenes


With winter approaching and all the snow storms back east I decided it was time to do a snow scene. I did the first watercolor on Arches hot pressed paper and the second on Arches cold pressed. I took them to class for critique this week and Jerry Stitt said he felt the snow was too gray and too warm. He thinks snow should be bluer, which he said makes it look colder. He also suggested a verticle behind the shed in the top painting, maybe a windmill or water tower. He always drums into us that you need an opposite thrust to create interest in a painting. I may add this piece soon and will repost it if I do. He also felt that the large tree in the second one was too uniform.  I should have know better on that one, since we are always being told that uniformity is monotonous. He did like the sky in the second painting though.  I personally prefer the first painting because it is more atmospheric and more in my style of painting. I used only three colors for both pieces, French ultramarine, Payne's Grey and light red.

19 comments:

  1. I've always struggled with snow and usually paint it too warm. I think the second painting is excellent, Jean. It's a super composition (whatever your tutor thinks) and beautifully painted too.

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  2. Hi Jean, Have you tried using Winsor Blue(gs) or Pthalo blue with a yellow and red and mix your won neutral? WInsor Blue will keep your mixes cool, and they won't look dead like Payne's Grey. I like both of these.....

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  3. Both spell the chillness of winter so beautifully, the fence in the first one is quite an element of interest for my eyes, may be with an additional element, it will catch more attention. The big tree in the second one probably looks uniform only since it is bare , nice works!

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  4. It's nice to see, winter sceenes are coming back to blogs again, already missed them.
    I really liked your first painting, especially the sky:)

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  5. hmmm...I'm thinking about the advice...bluer snow makes it seem colder...I agree with the fact, but do we want to have a COLD thing on our walls, or perhaps a bit of red...to warm it up! The tall vertical thing in the top painting sounds like fun...I love the way you share Jean...helps us all!! Keep it up!

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  6. Michael: Thanks for you supportive comments. I am going to try this again with a slightly bluer/colder color.

    Maggie: I have not tried snow with Windsor blue. I am always scared of its staining qualities. But maybe I should try it.

    Padmaja: Trees in nature are more uniform on the whole but we are taught to use artistic license so as not to have monotony.

    Egle: Thanks for checking out my blog. I don't do many winter scenes. It is more of an exercise for me.

    Saundra: I agree about having a cold painting hanging on the wall. That's why I don't do many winter scenes.

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  7. Jean, water it down a lot and it will be fine.....

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  8. So many thoughts are provoked by the lonely leafless trees, Jean. Great work, you are talented with atmosphere!

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  9. Io uso quasi sempre il blu cobalto con una punta di terra di siena bruciata. In questo caso ho spruzzato del bianco che ha reso il colore più freddo. Ciao Elvi

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  10. I like both of these Jean, but prefer the second. I think you'll find that any tree in an open situation (not crammed up against others and with an even distribution of light) will grow in a fairly uniform way. Yours looks great. ;-)

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  11. I'm always drawn to winter paintings. Wonderful work.
    Balisha

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  12. We can always improve, but I think your teacher is being a bit severe. These were the ones you made , and they are both beautiful and full of the right winter atmosphere. The next ones will be with all the good advice in your ears, and probably they will only be different from these ones...

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  13. Mi sono accorta che ti ho dato informazioni sul blu, ma non ti ho fatto i complimenti per queste tue due belle opere. Ciao. Elvi

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  14. Beautiful paintings Jean. I left a comment earlier but it doesn't seem to be showing.

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  15. Marie: Thanks so much for the encouragement.

    Elvi: Grazie mille

    John: Trees do grow uniformly but we are always told in class that we don't have to make them so in a painting. Unevenness is more appealing than uniformity.

    Balisha: Thanks for visiting my blog and for your comments.

    Jane: I really cherish the comments of my lecturer because I know I have become a better painter through attending his classes. I always like to share his comments with my fellow bloggers in case they learn something along with me.

    Caroline: Did not get the previous comment but thanks for this one.

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  16. lovely snow secenes ...both skies are beautiful jean ..it's interesting reading your feedback from your tutor ...thankyou for sharing them.

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  17. Jane: I like to think skies are my forte. Usually everything else in my paintings are just a backdrop for the skies. I love painting them and that's why my skies usually take up three quarters of my paintings.

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  18. Your teacher sounds like a real pro. It is so important to keep your own style and feeling about your art having the authority behind your back. Be strong!
    I like the minimalistic feel of the first one very much.

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  19. Lovely paintings of the snow, you have captured the cold so perfectly, wish we had a little of that here in Botswana it has been extremely hot and the rain just refuses to come.

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